Romeo and Juliet Review

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Ranking as one of the most prevalent love stories of all time, William Shakespeare’s epic tragedy, “Romeo and Juliet” resurfaces in a new movie release set for theaters October 11. The screenplay for this movie was written by Sir Julian Fellowes, creator of the famous PBS series Downton Abbey, and will appeal to viewers in their late teens through early twenties.

“Romeo and Juliet” is arguably Shakespeare’s best work. It is definitely the most read and recognized in popular culture. The tragic romance tells the tale of two star-crossed lovers who die under dramatic circumstances and in doing so, mend the feud between their families. It is a timeless piece that continues to be loved by scholars and casual readers alike.

“Romeo and Juliet” is required reading in most high school curriculum’s; however, it is a play that can be revisited over and over throughout life. Shakespeare possessed a unique gift of writing incredibly commonplace phrases and thoughts in such a way as to emphasize a hidden or deeper meaning. The diction of Elizabethan England may appear uncomfortable to modern readers, but once understood, the prose is beautiful. In his plays, Shakespeare uses blank verse, a type of iambic pentameter that does not rhyme. There is a regular line length and syllable count in each verse. This regularity can enhance the reading experience, turning each line into an expressive dance of words.

The main theme in “Romeo and Juliet” is love. A fervent, life-altering love that can only be experienced once in a lifetime, is discovered by Romeo and Juliet. Throughout the course of a few days, they declare their secret love for each other and make plans to elope. Unfortunately for these young lovers, events do not unfold as they planned and their lives end before they can run away together. This play encompasses lots of emotions such as excitement, uncertainty, comedy, anticipation, erratic anxiety, love, fear, happiness, and betrayal. It is clearly a tumult of feelings structured in five short acts.

Especially at Colorado School of Mines, it is incredibly easy to dismiss literature as an unimportant facet in our daily lives. After all, many students here dislike the humanities very much, or at least struggled with them in high school. Nevertheless, students should not disregard literature altogether. This movie is a great place to start and will blow everyone away.


Sarah Dewar

Junior, Mechanical Engineering 2016. Proud Alpha Phi Fraternity member. Avid music listener. Fan of British film and literature. Looking to write about artists, entertainment, and activities on the verge of popularity. Love sports and beautiful Colorado.


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