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Campus Sexual Assault Policies

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Written by Anonymous

Posted on 11 November 2014

Colleges nationwide are required to have policies that deal with discrimination based on gender, sexual assault, and sexual harassment. There are two main laws that address these problems: the Clery Act (updated by the Campus SaVE Act), which requires colleges to report crimes, and Title IX, which deals with gender based discrimination. If colleges want to receive any federal funding, it is required that they abide by these laws.

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Scientific Discoveries this Week - 11/10/14

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Written by Magnus Chun

Posted on 11 November 2014

Melbourne, Australia- It is a known fact that there is no way the temperature can go below absolute zero, or negative 273 Kelvin. This is the point where all motion in matter stops and is thought to be unreachable. However, recent experiments using ultracold atoms have measured temperatures that are negative in the absolute temperature scale. Tapio Simula, Monash Research Fellow in Physics at Monash University, states, "The journey there, however, is quite the opposite to what you might expect. Simply removing heat from the equation to make things colder and colder is not the answer. Instead, you need to heat things hotter than infinitely hot!". Research at Monash University is showing that under very special circumstances, a system may become more ordered when more energy is added beyond a value which corresponds to an infinite temperature.

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Headlines from Around the World: 11/10/14

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Written by Magnus Chun

Posted on 11 November 2014

Election Day was November 4 and the Republicans were the big winners. 62% of elected Governors in the US are now Republicans, 56% of the elected House of Representatives are Republicans, and 52% of the elected Senate is Republicans (CNN). Republicans swept state legislative races by winning control of more than 68 legislative chambers, largest since 1920 (CNN). In addition, Ms. Mia Love narrowly won election to a House seat for Utah, becoming the first black woman to represent the Republican Party in Congress. For Colorado in the Senate, Cory Gardner (Republican) defeated Mark Udall (Democrat) by 48.5% to 46.0%. Governor John Hickenlooper (Democrat) was re-elected as governor defeating Bob Beauprez (Republican) 49% to 46%. The governor became the only Democrat to win the statewide contest and one of the few bright spots for the Democrats. "This is a moment and an opportunity to seize the day and to move forward," Hickenlooper said, "Not to dwell on the wedge issues that too often divide us." Hickenlooper's opponent, Beauprez acknowledged, "There just aren't enough options to get us across the finish line." Beauprez said that he failed to capture the energy and could not offer a "fresh face" for voters.

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Chemistry Seminar: Xiaotai Wang

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Written by Katy Dykes

Posted on 11 November 2014

CSM was honored to hear from Dr. Xiaotai Wang on Friday in his lecture on computational mechanistic studies of transitional metal-catalyzed synthetically useful organic reactions. Dr. Xiaotai Wang has been a professor at the University of Colorado, Denver, since 1997. His last lecture at Mines was over 10 years ago on the synthesis of metal frameworks. Since then, Dr. Wang has been attracted to the field of computational chemistry. Dr. Wang said that he was drawn to this field because of its utility in providing insights into the designing of new molecules. He is currently researching the synthesis and of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with newer structures and a whole host of useful properties. Dr. Wang worked in a field called computational chemistry, a branch of chemistry involving computer simulations of chemical structures to assist in solving different chemical questions. Dr. Wang noted that there are two main divisions of computational quantum chemistry: wave function based and density function based.

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Campus Research: Geophysics Senior Design

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Written by Jared Riemer

Posted on 11 November 2014

For Mines seniors, their final year at Mines can be a stressful time. Not only are students trying to figure out what to do upon graduation, but they are also usually in the middle of senior design projects. In the geophysics department, students choose their own projects to research for one or two semesters and, while geophysics is usually concerned with what is beneath the earth, the students are allowed to explore different fields and research what interests them. The Oredigger sat down with geophysics student Katerina Gonzales to ask her about her research.

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Scientific Discoveries this Week - 11/02/14

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Written by Magnus Chun

Posted on 11 November 2014

California, USA: Researchers at University of California, San Francisco have found new genes that play a role in causing autism. Scientists identified 60 genes with a greater than 90% chance of increasing a child's autism risk. The researchers say these genes appear to be clustering around three sets of key biological functions: development of synapses in the brain, creation of genetic instructions, and DNA packaging within cells. Dr. Matthew State, chairman of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco, believes that the most important thing to take away from the studies is a new knowledge base. Instead of focusing on environmental factors, he says these studies are focusing on what happens inside of the brain.

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Is Algae the New Fuel of the Future?

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Written by Magnus Chun

Posted on 11 November 2014

What does one think of when he hears the word, "algae"? Many people think of how algae grows in aquatic environments and cause the many pool/pond owners problems. Those people have to encounter the problem of trying to remove algae from their aquatic environments. Pool owners are constantly frustrated about the large amounts of algae in their pools. However, this amount of algae may actually benefit society when looking at it from a different perspective.

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How to Ace Every Test

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Written by Magnus Chun

Posted on 11 November 2014

One of the top reasons why students do poorly on tests and exams is because of test anxiety and stress. Being stressed and going into an exam knowing that one will not do well is a one-way road to failure. According to Megan Harris, Academic Advising Coordinator for CASA at Colorado School of Mines, there are a few test taking strategies that can help cope with that anxiety before and during the test.

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Headlines from Around the World: 11/02/14

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Written by Magnus Chun

Posted on 11 November 2014

Nurse Kaci Hickox, who recently returned to the US after treating Ebola patients, went on a bike ride while being followed by a police cruiser and a group of journalists watching her every move. Maine Governor Paul LePage said that he would "exercise the full extent of his authority allowable by law to keep her away from public places." The governor has not set a court order for a quarantine, which is causing some people living in her neighborhood to panic. However, Hickox insisted that she was healthy. The government has yet to announce actions to be taken.

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Scientific Discoveries this Week - 10/26/14

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Written by Magnus Chun

Posted on 11 November 2014

Austin, Texas: A new study has found that the brain mechanisms engaged when people allow their minds to rest and reflect on things they have learned before may actually boost later learning. Researchers at University of Texas at Austin have concluded that mental rest strengthens and consolidates memories from recent learning tasks that will in fact boost future learning. Margaret Schlichting, a graduate student researcher, and Alison Preston, an associate professor of psychology and neuroscience, gave participants in the study two learning tasks in which participants were asked to memorize different series of associated photo pairs. Between the tasks, participants rested and could think about anything they chose. Brain scans showed that threads of information were making connections that helped in absorbing information for a later use. Preston suggests that this can be applied to everyday learning. Teachers or professors can spark initial thinking of what students already know before actually teaching a new topic, in order to help students' transition and connect their knowledge with new topics.

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Headlines from Around the World: 10/26/14

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Written by Magnus Chun

Posted on 11 November 2014

The Ebola scare continues, and, even with positive stories such as Nina Pham being cleared from her Dallas hospital, the cultural and economic strain of the virus is having a continued effect. In the end the greatest effect of the virus may be on the American economy as travel bans and fearful citizens have already caused airline stocks to drop and predicted economic losses swell to over $32.6 billion.

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My Career Path: Anita Peil, Mines SWE Founder (Chevron Lecture Series)

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Written by Magnus Chun

Posted on 11 November 2014

Dr. Anita Peil, a graduate from Colorado School of Mines with a BS in Mineral Engineering Chemistry in 1971, recently gave a speech regarding the career path that she chose and how it has impacted her and her ideas. Dr. Peil founded the SWE section at Colorado School of Mines and served as the first president. Then, she went on to obtain a PhD in Food Science from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. After her studies, she went on to work in the pharmaceutical section and now currently has over 30 years of global leadership in both public and private companies across the world.

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Scientific Discoveries this Week - 10/20/14

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Written by Magnus Chun

Posted on 22 October 2014

Japan- Dr. Misao Fukuda of the M&K Health Institute in Japan found evidence to support the possibility that human sex ratios may be influenced by temperature, although in a more subtle way, through a different mechanism. Research shows that in 1968, 1.07 boys were born in Japan for every girl. By 2012, that was down to 1.05. "Male conception seems to be especially vulnerable to external stress factors, including climate changes," Fukuda concludes. Furthermore, Fukuda investigated the data for fetal deaths in the ratio of male to female, which were 2 male per female. Nonetheless, changes to sex ratios for humans are so small that, there is no threat to our survival. But, "an increase in miscarriages for all fetuses may be one more effect of rapidly changing climates," Fukuda says.

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