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Scientific Discoveries this Week - 10/20/14

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Written by Magnus Chun

Posted on 22 October 2014

Japan- Dr. Misao Fukuda of the M&K Health Institute in Japan found evidence to support the possibility that human sex ratios may be influenced by temperature, although in a more subtle way, through a different mechanism. Research shows that in 1968, 1.07 boys were born in Japan for every girl. By 2012, that was down to 1.05. "Male conception seems to be especially vulnerable to external stress factors, including climate changes," Fukuda concludes. Furthermore, Fukuda investigated the data for fetal deaths in the ratio of male to female, which were 2 male per female. Nonetheless, changes to sex ratios for humans are so small that, there is no threat to our survival. But, "an increase in miscarriages for all fetuses may be one more effect of rapidly changing climates," Fukuda says.

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Headlines from Around the World: 10/20/14

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Written by Magnus Chun

Posted on 22 October 2014

The Ebola outbreak has amounted to 4000 deaths in the world and has affected West Africa, such as Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone, the worst. One of those deaths belonged to Thomas Duncan, the first person diagnosed with Ebola in the United States. The UN says more than 233 health workers working in West Africa have now died in the outbreak, the world's deadliest to date. A senior official said that they did not anticipate the scale of the Ebola outbreak. Chris Dye, from World Health Organization, said, "We've asked for a response of about $1 billion, so far we have around $300 million with more being pledged, so a bit less than half of what we need but it's climbing quickly all the time." President Barack Obama ordered screenings for Ebola at five American airports in the United States, including JFK International Airport in New York after being briefed by Center for Disease Control chief Dr. Tom Frieden earlier this week.

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Scientific Discoveries this Week - 10/07/92

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Written by Katy Dykes

Posted on 06 October 2014

Geneticists at Trinity College in Dublin have made a breakthrough in finding out why duplicate genes remain in the genome. Gene duplication involves the creation of sister genes, or duplicated genes, that can allow organisms to tolerate possibly deadly mutations. Researchers tested this robustness on yeast cells, showing that the gene duplication helped the cells survive in stressful conditions. They found that genes, thought to be duplicated over 100 million years ago, were still able to respond to different environments as they changed. Gene duplication was previously thought be redundant, but is now seen to be essential in the survival of entire species.

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Headlines from Around the World: 10/07/14

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Written by Magnus Chun

Posted on 06 October 2014

The first Ebola virus case has now spread to the USA. Currently, the Ebola patient, Thomas Duncan, is in full isolation in a hospital in Dallas. His family members are kept out of school and monitored for symptoms. Duncan got the Ebola virus when he went to Liberia and helped an Ebola virus patient to a hospital. He went back home to Dallas, where he carried the virus. Ebola spreads only through contact with bodily fluids, like blood. It is not contagious when there are no symptoms, and Duncan apparently had no fever when he got on the plane. He would have been contagious in Dallas, though, raising the possibility of the first case not just spotted but contracted in the United States. The World Health Organization now estimates that the virus has killed about 70 percent of people infected in West Africa. Also, in Liberia, an American cameraman working for NBC News has tested positive for Ebola and will be flown back to US for treatment.

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The World of Catalyst: Albemarle and Catlin Companies

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Written by Magnus Chun

Posted on 06 October 2014

Albemarle Sales Representative, Dr. Jennifer Nieweg, recently gave a presentation regarding the startup of her own company and her career path in various roles within Albemarle. Albemarle, headquartered in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, is a chemical manufacturing enterprise with operating plants across the world.

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Scientific Discoveries this Week - 9/29/14

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Written by Jacqueline Feuerborn

Posted on 29 September 2014

USA- In March, Harvard Physicists announced that they had found evidence of gravitation waves- variations in gravitational strength throughout space, which could act as crucial evidence for the Big Bang. However, new data from the Planck satellite shows that more dust is present in space than was expected. This means it is quite likely that the signals that were believed to be gravitational waves, in fact, could have simply been signals that were distorted from the dust. While this does not disprove the existence of gravitational waves, it does cast some doubt on the supposed confirmation of their existence.

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President's Distinguished Lecture: CoorsTek's $27 million gift to Mines

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Written by Magnus Chun

Posted on 29 September 2014

CoorsTek CEO, Dr. John Coors recently announced a major commitment. CoorsTek will provide $26.9 million in funding to the Applied Science and Engineering department at Colorado School of Mines. CoorsTek, headquartered in Golden, is a privately owned manufacturer of ceramics, semiconductor tooling, and other industrial products.

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Headlines From around the World: 9/29/14

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Written by Frank Knafelc

Posted on 29 September 2014

An employee of the Chicago airports O'Hare and Midway has been accused of starting a fire in the FAA Air Route Traffic Control facility in Aurora, III. The fire caused the delay and cancellation of over 2,000 of flights out of both of the airports and disrupted even more throughout the entire country. Since failing to cut his own throat near the location of the fire, he has been charged with the destruction of aircraft and aircraft facilities and faces twenty years in prison and a $250,000 fine.

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Academic Success at Mines

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Written by Magnus Chun

Posted on 29 September 2014

You just failed your first exam of the year. You are thinking to yourself, "There are two more exams, so if I get an A on both exams, I can still get a B in the class." Want to achieve a better GPA at Mines? Want to be more effective in studying and learning new concepts? If you answered yes to either question, you should know that academic success will come with hard work and motivation. Understanding a concept and excelling at exams is not a walk in the park. CASA (Center for Academic Support Resources) at Colorado School of Mines suggests these strategies for academic success: time and stress management, cooperative learning, and effective studying.

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Headlines from Around the World

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Written by Magnus Chun

Posted on 24 September 2014

With the Ebola virus going around in Africa and spreading rapidly, there is no wonder why one in four people in the United States are worried they or someone in their family will become the victim of this deadly virus, according to an international poll by CNN. Because the Ebola virus has no treatment or vaccine available, "Ebola outbreaks have a 90% fatality rate," according to CNN. Symptoms include severe fever, intense weakness, and internal and external bleeding. President Obama says that chances of the Ebola outbreak in the United States are extremely low and he said on Tuesday that the United States is leading international efforts to combat the virus. One of the efforts to combat this is shipping hospital equipment from the United States to Liberia starting on Friday. United States Aid Official Nancy Lindborg said, "The United States hopes its expanded effort to contain the spread of the virus will help rally other countries to respond to this epidemic." The plane will arrive at a facility where it will be staffed by 65 Americans who will help treat about 2500 people who were affected. Finally, according to Reuters,, United States Secretary of State John Kerry will hold discussions with other countries to discuss about the response to Ebola.

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Scientific Discoveries (Week of 9/15)

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Written by Magnus Chun

Posted on 24 September 2014

Sweden: A team of scientists led by Martin Gustafasson of Sweden's Chalmers University of Technology have captured the sound of an atom for the first time. An important feature of atoms is that "they are much smaller than the wavelength of optical light, making them appear like a point." In order to capture the sound, the scientists use microwave radiation, which has longer wavelengths. Gustafasson said, "due to the slow speed of sound, we will have time to control the quantum particles while they travel." In this way, the scientists can be able to record data of the sound because sound waves travel much slower than light waves. The team hopes to use this information to learn about quantum behavior, including in electrical circuits and on a bigger scale, computers.

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Fiske Planetarium

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Written by Katy Dykes

Posted on 24 September 2014

Staring up at the ceiling of a planetarium always feels a bit surreal. From watching the sunset in sped up time, to outlining constellations with one's fingers while staring at thousands of tiny dots on the ceiling, to feeling one's stomach drop while plummeting through the stars faster than the speed of light, there is just something amazing about leaning back in that chair, looking up at something so big, and feeling so small. Fiske Planetarium on CU Campus provides just that: the childlike wonder of seeing the universe in all its complexity and vastness.

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Intersection at 19th Street and Highway 6 Planning Meeting

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Written by Jacqueline Feuerborn

Posted on 24 September 2014

Planning MeetingTuesday, September 16 found numerous students and residents of the City of Golden gathering in the Green Center. The event that drew everyone was a presentation about the intersection between US Highway 6 and 19th Street. This is an intersection that is known for the inherent danger associated with it, for both cars, bicyclists and pedestrians. In the meeting, the City of Golden had six different areas with presentations and people to talk to and ask questions of. These sections isolated the different topics that needed to be discussed in relation to the upcoming changes to the intersection.

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